I was wrong: deliberate practice does NOT equal boring blog posts

Deliberate practice is just the scientific method applied to your craft.


Jason Haaheim, principal timpanist, Metropolitan Opera Orchestra

A while back I wrote that my deliberate practice strategy made for boring blog posts.

Then I stumbled across Jason Haaheim’s blog. He makes deliberate practice fascinating.

Jason is the principal timpanist for the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra and has an unconventional background. Compared to most professional musicians, he got a late start and didn’t play in an orchestra until high school. Rather than going to music school, he got an M.S. in electrical engineering and worked at a nanotech company for 10 years while methodically practicing the timpani before and after work and freelancing with the Civic Orchestra of Chicago (a training orchestra associated with the Chicago Symphony). He continued auditioning until he won his current post at the Met Opera.

That summary sounds so nice and neat and inspirational, doesn’t it? But what it doesn’t show is the grueling, systematic process it took to get there. His journey was a lot messier than the condensed narrative suggests, and he shares what he learned, and continues to learn, in the kind of detail that science geeks and the performance-obsessed can really chew on.

I’m thrilled at all of this information because it gives me more ideas for improving my own practice. I particularly like how Jason treats his practice journal like a lab notebook and keeps it online with his self-recordings so he can easily search and cross-reference his notes, even over many years. Perhaps it’s because I also have a science background, but I really love how he turned his practice journal into a database. I will definitely incorporate his method soon.

My guitar teacher understands the importance of deliberate practice as well. She shares this video with all of her new students so we know what to expect from her and vice versa:

A big part of deliberate practice is learning how to diagnose and fix our own mistakes as much as we can–after all, we spend far more time in the practice room than in our lessons. My guitar teacher handles this by giving us a handout with the most common hand/finger mistakes she encounters in beginners and exercises to remedy them. That way, we can spend the lesson time on areas where we’re stuck, on things we don’t know how to fix ourselves. So efficient!

I currently practice in front of a full-length mirror so I can watch my hands from different angles and also check for any visible tension in the rest of my body as I play. This is in addition to staying in tune with how my body feels, especially when I’m pushing myself. That’s helped me self-diagnose a lot of problems. I call my teacher my personal trainer for my hands because our entire focus right now is turning my clumsy, weak, ordinary fingers into flexible, strong guitarist fingers. Deliberate practice is as important for absolute beginners like me as for pros like Jason.

I’ll end this post with what may be the nerdiest, and my favorite, description of what music is:

Your job [as a musician] is to vibrate air at people and make them feel a thing.


Jason Haaheim (quoting William Short, principal bassoonist, Metropolitan Opera Orchestra)