Learning the uke eventually means teaching the uke

James Hill says that once you learn the ukulele, teaching comes with the territory. It doesn’t matter if you’re a rank beginner like me–someone will see how much fun you’re having and ask you to teach them.

In my case, that someone is my mom.

She bought a uke last month and I’ve been teaching her the basics. She now knows the C, F, G7, and Am chords (“the big four”) and is working on changing between them smoothly. Yesterday, I had her try to figure out the chords to “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” by ear (like me, she’s classically trained and depends too much on sheet music so I wanted to show her how empowering learning by ear can be).

The ukulele, more than any other instrument I’ve encountered, is incredibly social. I don’t know whether it’s because of its unintimidating size, its cheerful sound, or the laid-back culture surrounding it, but I’ve noticed the ukulele draws people in. Sure, you can play it seriously, but you don’t have to and that’s okay. And even if you play it seriously, that doesn’t mean taking yourself seriously, and I love that.

I can’t wait to see where Mom’s ukulele adventure takes her.